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Since Booster Trooper is fresh in my head and the NBA lottery draft selection occurred only a few days ago, it’s only natural that I’ve been making many comparisons between the two. With some re-polishing, can Booster Trooper find its place in the video game industry? Do my lowly Clippers have an outside chance at picking Wesley Johnson or Al-Farouq Aminu? Among all the indie titles available this year, would I select this game in a draft; and how the hell did the Wizards steal the number one overall pick? GAHH!

With that being said, Booster Trooper is far from being the John Wall or Evan Turner of this year’s titles, but with some updates and time, can this game make its impression on the market?

Right from the get-go, players will notice the old-school side-scrolling design that hearkens back to XBLA’s smash hit Shadow Complex. In theory, a game that resembles a multiplayer version of a popular title seems like a fairly unique idea. In reality, that’s Booster Trooper’s biggest downfall. Not because it resembles another game, but because it is so heavily dependent on the multiplayer aspect.

Since the game has very little marketing appeal, it’s difficult to get players interested in it – no players equals no game. Most of the time you’ll be stuck playing with bots, and on occasion you’ll find a server with two or three other players, but that’s hardly enough to maintain interest.

In the game’s defense, there has been a steady increase in the number of dedicated servers, but again, there doesn’t seem to be a substantial rise in community activity.

Casting aside the game’s largest pitfall, there are a variety of different maps to explore, and surprisingly, DNS Development did a very good job at varying and balancing each of them. Some of the maps are horizontally challenging while others are vertically challenging. Not to mention, the different obstacles and multi-levels you can fly up and down do provide a unique style.

On the other hand, while the game succeeds in map balance, it fails in weapon balance. Players select between five different primary weapons, two secondary, and two different grenade types, and duke it out in your basic multiplayer scenarios: e.g. deathmatch, capture the flag, and team deathmatch.

There is a certain degree of potential and appeal in the gameplay, but there are blatant balancing issues between each of the weapons. It’s obvious the developers tried to go for a “Rock, Paper, Scissors” format, but in all honesty, if you were preparing to go to war and you had to choose between a shotgun or a rocket launcher, which one would you choose? I rest my case.

The developers did their best to nerf some of the stronger weapons, yet they still overpower the weaker ones. For example, if you’re running around with the minigun, it’ll cease fire once you leap into the air. Yet, it fires 10 rounds a second and packs a mega punch. If you have that much firepower, basically all you have to do is stand in one spot and quickly pull off a few rounds when you see an enemy. Those who try to out-tactician it without the sniper rifle, I tip my hat off to you; the odds are highly stacked against you.

There are obviously some issues the developers need to address, and it seems as though they’ve been diligently working out all the kinks. When you finally do get a decent game going, there are moments of intensity and fun to be found.

As it currently stands, the potential of the game is limited to the depth it produces. And with very little community interest, I’d have to pick this game as a late second round draft pick, at best.

Gamer Limit gives Booster Trooper a 4.0/10

  1. Disappointing. It looked really cool from the trailer.

    Thanks for the review.

  2. avatar Vic Rattlehead

    For the most part, this game looks like Soldat, except it costs money, and there is limited ammunition. If you want a jet-pack arena shooter, give that game a try.

  3. avatar Anonymous

    Boostor

  4. avatar k63

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